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What is Solar Energy?

June 1, 2022

What is Solar Energy?

This video gives a simple but compelling introduction to what is solar energy?. Did you know that all of the energy we use comes from the sun,? You probably know that’s true for solar panels, but the sun is also the ultimate source for energy generated by wind, water, and fossil fuels. Watch this video to learn more about renewable sources of energy and more.

 

[TRANSCRIPT]

 

Did you know that all of the energy we use comes from the sun?

You probably know that’s true for solar panels, but the sun is also the ultimate source for energy generated by wind, water, and fossil fuels. It works like this. Heat from the sun drives the air currents and water cycle that turn wind turbines and power hydroelectric dams. Meanwhile, the rays of the sun also the plants grow that ultimately become wood, coal, and gas.
What if we could cut out the middleman to open the most direct path between the sun and the energy we use every day? Let’s take a step back so we can understand the real power and potential of the sun. The sun is a massive, flaming sphere of gases, 330 thousand times more massive than Earth.  At its core, the sun is 27 million degrees Fahrenheit, which is 60 thousand times the temperature of your oven when you bake a pizza!

We may run out of oil and gas in the next 50 years

The sun gives off LOTS of energy into space as heat and light, called solar energy. If we could capture all of the solar energy that reaches the Earth’s surface, we could continuously run a 25-inch television on every square meter of Earth – and still have energy some left over! Right now, we aren’t  using all this energy — instead, we mostly rely on coal, oil, natural gas, and other sources. But these sources aren’t renewable, which means they’ll eventually run out. In fact, if we keep using these non-renewable resources at the rate we are now, we may run out of oil and gas in the next 50 or so years and coal in the next 115 years. Not only are these non-renewable resources going to run out, they’re also polluting our planet and contributing to climate change.
The sun’s energy, on the other hand, will not “run out” for the next 5 billion years. That makes it a renewable resource.  Other renewable resources like wind and water can also provide us with energy. But even all the energy we can get from all these sources added together is still less than 1 percent of the solar energy reaching Earth! It’s clear that the potential of solar energy massively outshines its competitors.

How exactly do we harness solar energy?

Solar panels directly convert sunlight into usable electricity using special materials, like silicon. Another way to harness solar energy is through a process called concentrated solar power, which uses thousands of mirrors to reflect sunlight onto a tower. The heat captured in the tower makes steam that flows through a steam turbine, which generates electricity. But even though we have these promising technologies to capture solar energy, there are still many challenges with using solar energy on a large scale.
For example, the amount of solar energy we can harness can change based on place and time. Some parts of the world get much more sun than others — solar panels in the Sahara desert will produce more energy than those in Seattle. But even in the sunniest places, the sunlight still isn’t constant. The changing of seasons, the cycle from day to night, and even clouds in the sky can reduce the amount of available energy. To make solar energy usable when and where it’s less available, we need to improve energy storage and transmission systems.

More efficient and less expensive

Above all, we also need to make solar technologies more efficient and less expensive. Currently, less than 1% of all the energy produced and used in the United States comes from solar energy. But as more researchers, private citizens, entrepreneurs, and government agencies are recognizing its amazing potential, we’re moving closer to a solar- powered society every day. The more we advance our use of solar energy, the brighter our future can be!

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

My experience after two years owning Solar Panels

June 1, 2022

My experience after two years owning Solar Panels

My experience after two years owning Solar Panels. After two years of owning solar panels, I look at the finances of owning solar panels to see if it was a positive investment.

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

4 Year Update Having Solar Panels

May 31, 2022

4 Year Update Having Solar Panels

[TRANSCRIPT]

 

My 4 Year Update Having Solar Panels. I saw a pretty sharp decline  in the amount of solar produced. Since my solar  panels are nearing their 4 year anniversary, I  thought it would be a good idea to share what  I’ve learned living with solar panels in an  area you might not think they’d be good for, as well as what happened last year. Do I still  think getting solar panels was a good idea?  Let’s see if we can come to a decision on this.
I’m Matt Ferrell. Welcome to Undecided. There’s no question where my electricity is coming from when it’s being produced on my roof.  You could probably also include a third reason to the mix, my Tesla Model 3. Charging up your EV with electricity that you generate yourself  is pretty cool. I guess you could say the idea of energy independence is enticing.
My house has a few challenges. If  you live in the northern hemisphere,  it’s best to have a southern facing  roof to maximize your solar production,  but my house is oriented more east-to-west.  That’s why I have panels on both sides of my roof,  so I can capture morning and afternoon sun. The  second issue is that my roof is pretty small. And  finally, I have a fair amount of trees on the  western side of my house that start to block  the sun in the mid-to-late afternoon. Like I  said, my house is a bit challenging for solar.

4 Year Update Having Solar Panels – Solar panels have reduced our reliance on the grid

Continuing with my 4 Year Update Having Solar Panels. For the past few years my solar panels have reduced our reliance on the grid by about 54%,  which is what we expected given my  home’s issues. We’re still on track  for the system to have paid for itself in savings by 2026 (it’s a 7-8 year payback),  but there’s some wrinkles to that I’ll get to in a bit. First though, I’ve got to get into last year’s issues. We saw a pretty steep drop in performance  in 2021, but it’s really important to give these numbers some context. If you don’t have solar,  it’s easy to armchair quarterback and  ridicule solar as a waste of money.
Some of the comments I see most often on my solar panel videos bring up the misperception  that solar panels degrade and die quickly. Others  question the accuracy of solar installers telling  you how much you’ll produce each year … sometimes  for the next 10, 15, 20 years. Weather is going  to be a huge factor in how well your solar panels  work.
The criticism is usually, if a meteorologist  struggles to predict the weather a week out,  how can you predict years of solar production. On that first point about degradation, it’s  absolutely true that you’ll see a decline  year over year. However, if you have quality  made panels from the major manufacturers,  those panels will last 30+ years. For these panels you’ll have warranties that guarantee minimal losses over the next 20 years, but that’s  not end of life … that’s just the warranty period.

4 Year Update Having Solar Panels – 10 year production  guarantee

In my case, I have LG solar panels on my home that are guaranteed to produce at least 88.4%  of their original efficiency, which means  you’re talking about a .5% drop each year.  And that’s why I had to raise an  eyebrow at last year’s numbers. My solar installer offered a 10 year production  guarantee. If my panels produce less than 95% of  their projection, they’ll pay the difference  in the cost of electricity as you will see during this “4 Year Update Having Solar Panels” video.
They projected that we’d be producing close to 6,600  kWh each year for the first few years,  but last year we produced only 6,479 kWh.  The year before we produced 7,293 kWh.  So comparing 2021 to 2020, we saw an 11% drop in  production. So yeah, I was a little perplexed,  frustrated, with a dash of concern. To add to that  our electricity use had increased slightly because  my wife started working from home due to the pandemic, and our electricity prices had risen … a  lot.
Back when we got the solar panels installed  we were paying about $0.24/kWh. Now we’re paying  about $0.30/kWh. On average we use roughly  950 kWh per month over the course of a year,  so you’re talking about going from a potential  bill of $228 a few years ago to $285 today. That’s when the data nerd in me kicked into gear  and I started crunching the numbers to figure out what was going on. But before getting to what I found,  there’s some other numbers worth crunching.

4 Year Update Having Solar Panels – Your solar panel production

I’ve been asked on previous solar panel videos, which I’m including on this video “4 Year Update Having Solar Panels”,  how much my home insurance went up with solar panels,  and that really depends on your provider. My home  insurance didn’t change at all with solar, but we’re planning on moving at some point soon, so  we’ve been looking to see if there are some better deals for our home and auto insurance. When looking at your solar panel production,  it’s important to not focus and obsess  on the day-to-day numbers.
There’s going  to be an incredible amount of volatility  day to day depending on the weather.  Cloudy days, rain, snow, etc.  It all depends, so you have to look longer  term when assessing how it’s performing and if  it’s worth the cost of the system. It’s the same  reason my solar installer does a yearly guarantee. Take a look at my monthly numbers year over  year and you’ll start to spot some clear trends.
Summer is obviously going to be peak production  because of the increased daylight hours  and the sun being at a higher angle in the sky.  During winter you have shorter days and a lower  angle of sun. The yearly trend looks a lot  like a daily trend. Very low production  in the winter and none at night, and a swell  during the summer months or middle of the day.  However, something should jump out at you  on this chart.

4 Year Update Having Solar Panels – Weather doesn’t really factor

The 2021 numbers between  May and September are dramatically  lower than the years before it. I knew weather was going to play a role in how  effective my panels would perform, but I didn’t  expect such a huge swing to happen year over  year. That’s when I pulled up the historical  weather data for my area. If you overlay the  amount of precipitation on top of the solar  production chart, the correlation is pretty clear.
Here in the New England area, 2021 was one of the  warmest and wettest on record, especially if you  look at the July, August, and September data.  2021 was the third warmest on record going all  the way back to 1895. It was also the third  wettest year on record and July 2021 coming in  as the wettest month on record. Massachusetts  typically sees about 4 inches of rain in July,  but last year we saw an average of 10.3 inches. So the mystery was solved for  why 2021’s production was so  low. It wasn’t anything wrong with my  panels, inverters, or other hardware.
Thankfully, if you look at what we’ve seen so far  in 2022, everything is back to normal. In fact,  April’s production numbers were the best  we’ve seen so far after four years of data.  While you might think this challenged my belief  in only vetting solar production numbers year  to year vs. day to day, and that weather doesn’t  really factor in too much long term, it hasn’t.  2021’s yearly number came in at 6,479.6 kWh with  a prediction from my installer of 6,549 kWh.  That prediction was off by about 1%, which  really isn’t bad at all.
The variability  in seasonal weather conditions is factored into  historical data that solar installers pull from  to make their future production numbers. And  from what I’m seeing, it’s pretty accurate … even  though I’ve seen wild swings between a couple of  years. 2020 was about 10.8% higher than predicted.  They worked out the prediction on the conservative side of what we might see.

4 Year Update Having Solar Panels – Money we’re saving on our electric bill

So we bank some credits in  the summer that wipe out our electric bills in  those months and into the fall. And during the  winter we’re primarily pulling from the grid like  anyone else. We also have solar renewable energy  credits (SREC). We’re getting $126.22 a month  in SREC credits for 10 years, so we’ll be seeing  $15,146 from that. That leaves us on the hook  for $12,380 out of pocket for the cost of our  solar panels. But then you have to look at the  money we’re saving on our electric bill. We were  spending about $2,600 a year on electricity, but  we’ve been saving almost $1,500 a year with solar.  And since our electricity prices have risen  to $0.30/kWh, our savings has actually gone  up a little bit.
All of that rolled together  is how our solar panel system will pay for  itself sometime in 2026, and the panels should  easily go another 20 years or more after that,  so they’ll be producing free,  clean electricity at that point.  Again, I can’t say this enough, the warranty  period is not the end of life for the panel. But here’s that wrinkle I brought up earlier about  my specific return on investment. I’m not going  to be living in my house in 2026. I’m not going  to be living in this house a year from now.
Am I going to lose out on that money? Am I going  to have a hard time selling my home with solar panels on it? On that first point, no, I’m not  going to be selling my solar panels at a loss.  A home’s value actually increases with  solar panels. It’s not that different from doing a kitchen or bathroom renovation.  And solar panels are very popular in my area. Let’s continue with my 4 Year Update Having Solar Panels.

4 Year Update Having Solar Panels – Saving money on electricity

According to a study by  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which used  data from 8 states over an 11 year time period,  you can expect to see $4 per watt of installed  solar capacity added to the value of your home.  In my case, that could be a $38,000 increase. To  me that sounds too high. But according to Zillow,  they saw homes with solar panels selling for 4.1%  more. And the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  reported seeing an increase in home value by $20  for every $1 reduction in annual utility bills.  That math would work out to about $30,000 for  my house, which isn’t that far off from the  first study.
The bottom line: the more money  your solar panels save you on electricity,  the more it increases your house’s value.  So do I still think getting solar panels for my  home was worth it. That’s a big yes. For my goals,  which was saving money on electricity over  time and ensuring my power was coming from a  clean energy source, it ticked all the boxes. Our  system cost $20,727 after the Federal Tax Credit.
By the time we leave this house, we’ll have  received about $6,000 in SREC payments.  About $1,500 a year in electricity savings, so add  another $6000 on top of that. We’ll have whittled  the payback down to about $8,000 by the time we  leave. And if the $30,000 increase in value holds true, the return on investment will have been well  worth it … but that wasn’t my only goal. Again,  I did this for some energy independence and to  ensure I was getting energy from a clean source. That’s my 4 Year Update Having Solar Panels.

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

How do Photovoltaics Work?

August 13, 2021

How do Photovoltaics Work?

by Gil Knier

 

What is Photovoltaics?

How do Photovoltaics Work? Photovoltaics is the direct conversion of light into electricity at the atomic level. Some materials exhibit a property known as the photoelectric effect that causes them to absorb photons of light and release electrons. Additionally, in the 1960s, the space industry began to make the first serious use of the technology to provide power aboard spacecraft. Through the space programs, the technology advanced, its reliability was established, and the cost began to decline. During the energy crisis in the 1970s, photovoltaic technology gained recognition as a source of power for non-space applications. Further, the current produced is directly dependent on how much light strikes the module.

Photovoltaic modules and arrays produce direct-current (dc) electricity. They can be connected in both series and parallel electrical arrangements to produce any required voltage and current combination. How do Photovoltaics Work?

These are referred to as “multijunction” cells (also called “cascade” or “tandem” cells). Multijunction devices can achieve a higher total conversion efficiency because they can convert more of the energy spectrum of light to electricity.

High-energy photons

A multijunction device is a stack of individual single-junction cells in descending order of band gap (Eg). Much of today’s research in multijunction cells focuses on gallium arsenide as one (or all) of the component cells. Such cells have reached efficiencies of around 35% under concentrated sunlight. Other materials studied for multijunction devices have been amorphous silicon and copper indium diselenide. As an example, the multijunction device below uses a top cell of gallium indium phosphide, “a tunnel junction,” to aid the flow of electrons between the cells, and a bottom cell of gallium arsenide. Thanks for reading How do Photovoltaics Work article.

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

How Do Solar Panels Work for Your Home?

August 12, 2021

Solar pow Do Solar Panels Work for Your Home?

How Do Solar Panels Work for Your Home? For solar panels, the photovoltaic effect occurs when photons from the sun’s rays hit the semi conductive material (typically silicon) in the cell of the solar module. The photons activate electrons, causing them to free themselves from the semi-conductive material.

Due to the structure of a solar panel, the free electrons move in a single direction through the junction of the panel. This movement creates an electrical current that is then sent to an inverter to be harnessed by your home.

 

How is solar energy used in your home?

The power generated by your solar system is direct current (DC). Your inverter then captures the DC energy and transitions (or ‘inverts’) it to alternating current (AC) in order to make it in a usable state for your home.

The most common residential solar modules, or solar panels, contain monocrystalline or polycrystalline (also called multicrystalline) solar cells. Both types of cells produce electricity when exposed to sunlight, however there are some key differences between the two:

  • Monocrystalline cells tend to appear darker in color, often black or dark grey
  • Polycrystalline cells often appear a dark blue when exposed to light
  • You may be able to see small crystalline pieces of silicon melded together to form the wafer in polycrystalline cells
  • Monocrystalline cells generate higher panel efficiency
  • Monocrystalline cells tend to be more expensive

There are many panel manufacturers that build panels containing both mono and polycrystalline wafers to form solar cells. These are capable of harvesting energy from a wider spectrum of light. Additionally, if space is limited on your roof or project site, a higher-efficiency, monocrystalline panel may be preferred.

Alternatively, a lower-cost, slightly less efficient, polycrystalline panel may do the job. Be sure to ask what type of cell (“mono or poly”) your home solar system design contains. Additionally, this distinction may affect the aesthetics and economics of your project.

 

How does sun exposure affect solar panel efficiency?

More important is that your solar panel array(s) are installed in areas that receive good insolation throughout the day. The arrays should be free from as much shading from trees or neighboring obstructions as possible. This will ensure your system is as productive as possible, given the site conditions. Further, more sun exposure means more photons hit the solar panel, thereby freeing more electrons and creating a stronger current, meaning more power for your home. Due to the need for trenching and a more comprehensive racking structure, ground-mount installations tend to be more expensive than a roof-mounted installation.

 

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

How Solar Energy Works

August 12, 2021

How Solar Energy Works

How Solar Energy Works. Have you ever looked at the solar panels on roofs and wondered exactly what they do, and how? Well, those hi-tech expanses of shimmering glass are actually just one component in a complex network that harnesses the sun’s renewable energy to deliver electricity to the home within.

Let’s take a simple, step-by-step look at how solar power works.

How Do Solar Panels Make Electricity?

STEP 1:  Sunlight activates the panels

The solar panels are made with a layer of silicon cells and grouped into arrays.  Each solar panel is in a metal frame, a glass casing, and is surrounded by a film and wiring. Additionally, the solar cells can then absorb sunlight.

STEP 2:  The cells produce electrical current

A solar cell is a thin semiconductor wafer. The solar cell has two layers and made of silicon. A positively charged layer and a negatively charged layer. This process forms an electric field. A photovoltaic solar cell absorbs light from the sun. It energizes the cell and causes electrons to ‘come loose’ from atoms within the semiconductor wafer. The electric field surrounding the wafer set the electrons in motion. This motion creates the electrical current.

STEP 3: The electrical energy is converted

Now you have solar panels working efficiently to transform sunlight into electricity. This is Direct Current (DC) electricity. Electricity that powers homes is Alternating Current (AC) electricity. Inverters convert the current into AC electricity.

STEP 4:  The converted electricity powers your home

Solar power works exactly the same way as the electrical power generated through the grid by your electric utility company. So nothing within the home needs to change. Since you still remain connected to your traditional power company, you can automatically draw additional electricity to supplement any solar shortages from the grid.

STEP 5:  A net meter measures usage

On cloudy days and overnight, your solar panels may not be able to capture enough sunlight to use for energy. Additionally, in the middle of the day when nobody is home, they may collect surplus energy. Possibly, you could end up with more energy than you need to operate your home. Your utility company will often provide credits for any surplus power or “net metering”.

Conclusion

Now you can marvel at how photovoltaic technology can capture the vast power of the sun to operate a home. It may not be rocket science—but it definitely is human ingenuity at its best.

Interested in solar roofing for your home? Explore our solar products or find a credentialed solar installer in your area.

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

Health and Environmental Benefits of Solar Energy

June 4, 2021

The environmental benefit of solar energy

Health and Environmental Benefits of Solar Energy. Solar energy creates clean, renewable power from the sun and benefits the environment. Alternatives to fossil fuels reduce carbon footprint at home and abroad, reducing greenhouse gases around the globe. Solar is known to have a favorable impact on the environment.

Most of the electricity generated in the U.S. comes from fossil fuels like coal and natural gas. Extracting and using fossil fuels is expensive and harmful to the environment. By contrast, solar energy is free and readily abundant.

By investing in solar energy, you can help reduce our reliance on fossil fuels in favor of one of the most abundant, consistent sources of energy we have available. 

Solar energy decreases greenhouse gas emissions

Generating electricity with solar power instead of fossil fuels can dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). Greenhouse gases, which are produced when fossil fuels are burned, lead to rising global temperatures and climate change. Climate change already contributes to serious environmental and public health issues in the Northeast, including extreme weather events, rising sea levels, and ecosystem changes.

By going solar, you can reduce demand for fossil fuels, limit greenhouse gas emissions, and shrink your carbon footprint. One home installing a solar energy system can have a measurable effect on the environment. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the average home with solar panels in Connecticut uses 8,288 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity per year. Switching from fossil fuels to solar power in the state has the same emissions reduction effect as planting around 150 trees every year. These are more Health and Environmental Benefits of Solar Energy!

In New York, the average home uses 7,248 kWh of electricity annually. Choosing a clean source of electricity like solar panels can eliminate the same amount of carbon emissions that would result from burning over 5,000 pounds of coal each year.

Solar energy reduces respiratory and cardio health issues

One of the biggest benefits of solar energy is that it results in very few air pollutants. An analysis by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) found that widespread solar adoption would significantly reduce nitrous oxides, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter emissions, all of which can cause health problems. NREL found that, among other health benefits, solar power results in fewer cases of chronic bronchitis, respiratory and cardiovascular problems, and lost workdays related to health issues.

The benefits of solar energy are clear. Not only can you save money on your electric bills – you can also reduce your carbon footprint and improve the health of those around you. Compare quotes today to see how much you can save by going solar.

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

What are peak electricity hours?

May 21, 2021

What are peak electricity hours?

Different Ways Electric Companies Determine Billing

What are peak electricity hours? Why does electricity cost more during peak hours? Electric companies have 2 different modules for residential customers. The standard electricity plan requires a flat rate for usage regardless of the time of day it is. Time-of-use (TOU) plans have different cost for usage depending on the time of day you are drawing from the electricity grid.

So, what are peak electricity hours? TOU rates have two categories, one being peak hours. A peak electricity hour is when electricity is in higher demand, while an off-peak hour is when less individuals are using electricity, or the demand is lower.

Each electric provider determines their own hours and days for peak and off-peak hours.

Changing Your Habits to Use Non-Peak Electricity Hours

Even if you are not home during non-peak hours several appliances have scheduling functions. Appliances can be scheduled or used during non-peak hours. If you have an electric car, you can charge your vehicle at night.

Waking up earlier or going to bed later can also help offset your electric cost. Charging laptops, cell phones, and other devices at nighttime can make changes to your account.

Consider Installing a Battery

Lots of homeowners are looking into installing battery storage at home. They can charge the battery during non-peak hours and run off the battery during peak hours. Another perk to having a battery is if there is a power outage you can run off the battery as well.

Produce Your Own Power

Another way to take control of your electric bill is through the installation of solar panels. Installing solar panels allows homeowners to produce their own power and offset the cost of your electric bill. Depending on your usage you can completely customize your system to cover some or most of your utility bill. Thanks for reading “What are peak electricity hours?”.

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

Myths about Solar

May 3, 2021

Myths About Solar

Solar panels do not work in cold weather or when it is cloudy (Myths About Solar)

This is incorrect! Solar panels work even when the weather does not appear to be sunny. With the technology of solar panels, they are able to work effectively and efficiently all year round. Likewise, solar panels are even more effective on cooler temperatures rather than extreme heat.

Solar energy is too costly (Myths About Solar)

Investments in solar panels have been on the rise over the last decade. The average cost associated with solar has fallen by approximately 30%, while the cost associated with pulling from a power company grid has been steadily increasing. Additionally, It is cheaper to produce power through solar energy than it is from coal.

Solar panels will damage my roof (Myths About Solar)

Solar panels protect and preserve the areas covered by the panels. In the unlikely case that a damaged area of roof is located under a panel they are easy to remove for repairs.

Solar panels are bad for the environment (Myths About Solar)

Solar Panels are built to last 25+ years, after which, they can be recycled.

Learn More From Solar Titan USA

In conclusion, we hope this blog post has helped you to understand exactly what makes solar energy a green form of energy. Solar energy is a sustainable, renewable source of energy that can help us reduce our use of fossil fuels and slow climate change and the effects that it is having on our planet.

Are you ready to invest in a solar panel system for your home? The team at Solar Titan USA in Knoxville can help. We are here to answer all of your questions and alleviate any of your concerns. Contact us today to learn more about solar energy and how one small change could help build a better future for the next generation. Thanks for reading “Myths About Solar”.

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Finally, are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

Click Here To Get Started

What Makes Solar Energy Green?

December 21, 2020

What Makes Solar Energy Green?

Solar energy has become a leading source of green energy. The solar panel absorbs sunlight. It then transforms the photons into clean, renewable energy. As long as we don’t run out of sunshine, we won’t run out of the energy source for solar.

This sustainable energy source allows us to power and heat our homes without the use of fossil fuels. Homes that run on solar, don’t rely on coal, natural gas, or petroleum. So, they don’t release any carbon emissions into the environment.

In today’s blog post, we are going to discuss these factors and others. We will talk about what makes solar energy a green energy source.

Interested in solar panels for your home? Solar Titan USA is here to help. We can help you make the right decisions on exactly what your home needs to run efficiently on solar energy. Contact us today to learn more.

Solar Is a Renewable Energy Source
Since solar energy is created from the transformation of photons into energy, the source is considered extremely renewable. As far as we can see into the future, the sun will be shining on the Earth. As long as the sun is shining, solar panels can receive photons from the sun. And transform the photons into energy we can use for our homes. Unlike fossil fuels, there is not a finite amount of solar energy available. Solar will remain a renewable energy source long into the foreseeable future.

Solar Is a Sustainable Energy Source
Since the sun’s rays are not a limited resource, there is no chance of us running out of solar energy. Everyone can produce solar energy without us being in danger of running out of photons. This is a large part of what makes solar power a sustainable source of energy.

In addition, collecting solar rays does not impact the environment. We don’t damage the sun, the atmosphere, our air, water, or any other part of the natural environment by transforming photons into energy. Unlike fossil fuels, solar energy does not require us to damage the Earth in any way.

Solar Does Not Release Carbon Emissions

A small amount of carbon emissions are released during production. However, once solar panels are manufactured, they do not release carbon emissions. Since solar energy does not require the use of fossil fuels, it will not contribute to the spike in greenhouse gases in our atmosphere or climate change.

Solar Energy Does Not Require the Extraction of Fossil Fuels
We have spoken about how the use of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide into our natural environment, but the extraction process of fossil fuels is also cause for concern. Extraction of fossil fuels often causes air and water pollution, harm to local communities, and can sometimes even lead to dangerous explosions, accidents, and spills.

With solar energy, we don’t have to frack, mine, or drill into the Earth. Solar energy is readily available for anyone who is willing to take the first step and invest in a solar panel system like those from Solar Titan USA.

Solar Energy Doesn’t Rely On Transportation
Once we consider this factor, we understand that fossil fuels have a negative impact on the earth in more ways than one. Fossil fuels create air pollution when we extract them, as we transport them, and as we use them to create energy. Furthermore, solar energy does not release carbon emissions.

Solar Panels Have a Long Life Expectancy
A concern that has recently risen is that solar panels are not the easiest products to recycle once they are ready to be replaced. Since solar panels have such a long life expectancy, not only will they be a one-time investment for most homeowners, but they are also a long-term solution for creating green energy for your home.

We hope this blog post has helped you to understand exactly what makes solar energy a green form of energy. Solar energy is a sustainable, renewable source of energy that can help us reduce our use of fossil fuels and slow climate change and the effects that it is having on our planet.

Are you ready to invest in a solar panel system for your home? The team at Solar Titan USA in Knoxville can help. We are here to answer all of your questions and alleviate any of your concerns. Contact us today to learn more about solar energy and how one small change could help build a better future for the next generation.

Solar Titan USA is certified by the North American Board of Energy Practitioners, Certified LG Chem Installer, certified Generac Installer, and a certified SolarEdge Installer.

Are you still not sure about solar panels but would like more information? Here is our FREE eBook titled “A Complete Guide On Solar Power”. Now you can learn more about solar energy and if and how it can help you. This eBook covers everything you need to know about solar power including information about Solar Titan USA.

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